How To Write A New Blog Post Every Day

How To Write A New Blog Post Every Day

7 days. 7 posts.

Wow, it’s been a full week now at the new RalfSkirr.com. And, looking at my blog posts, it’s been a morbid week. [I always wanted to be a horror author. Maybe that’s why I took the chance to bury clients, unicorns, and SEO.]

How do you go from posting 7 posts a year [my average since 2007] to 7 posts a week?

It starts with a resolution. I won’t call it a day on any day before the daily post is published. [Last night it kept me up until 4:30.]

Next you have to come up with a topic. That’s where for many aspiring writers panic sets in. The proverbial ‘writer’s block.’

There’s no such thing as writer’s block. It’s completely made up.

People don’t have writer’s block, they just don’t have an idea how to get started. They’re under the false impression a writer starts with a blank page and pulls something out of … nothing.

If you do it that way, of course you’ll be out of ideas quickly. No productive person creates content on a daily basis based on blank pages and a big fat …  nothing.

What you need is a starting point. Here are the starting points that I’ve used during my first week of consistent blogging.

1. I keep a notebook. Every day I spend a few minutes adding new ideas to the notebook. When it comes to actually sitting down and writing my daily post, I simply open my notebook and pick one of the ideas. That’s better than a blank screen, isn’t it?

It’s a pen and paper notebook. See image below. Digital notes never worked for me. I tried them all: Word, Scrivener, Excel, OneNote, etc. etc.

2. I move aspects from my current blog posts into my notebook for a future blog post. Let me explain.

When writing a sentence like ‘SEO is dead’ my mind immediately pops up 50 shades of why this isn’t entirely true. Why it needs to be explained in a specific context. Why this needs to be discussed in more detail. Yada, yada, yada.

If put all that stuff into the post, it’ll end up having 2000 words, and the message will get drowned in complexity.

So I restrict my post to the main point and move the ignored aspects to my notebook for future posts.

3. I use images to get my imagination started. Almost every day I visit Bigstockphoto.com. Not only to find images for my blog posts and business presentations, but also to find ideas. I’m a very linear and left-brained person, so this is a very unusual approach for me.

4. I react to thing I find on the internet. The death of social media was a reaction to a friend’s Facebook post, where she stated how overwhelmed with social media she was. You can also find inspiration in other people’s blog posts, or on Google news.

Those are just 4 starting points, but surely enough to get you through one week of blogging.

The main point being the notebook to collect ideas.

Ralf Skirr's Blogging Workspace At Starbucks Tukcom, Pattaya.
My workspace 🙂 and my notebook showing the pages for the 2 posts death of seo and death of social media. The one saying OK was published, the other still unpublished when I took the photo.